Pole Snap Bean, Oregon Giant (Organic)

Phaseolus vulgaris. Semi-flat Speckled Green Pods. 65 days.

This is the bean that introduced us to dual-purpose beans. We like to cook pods when they are big and still juicy, although at that point they have strings like a traditional string bean. Also tasty when smaller and stringless, but with a much milder flavor. Can be used as (huge) fresh shelling beans and/or for dry beans. Pods shed off a fair amount of rain when drying down. Plants tolerate shade and cold wet weather very well. Most famous for being an Oregon heritage bean popular since the 1930s and recently it appeared to be lost. Our “genuine” strain came from local seed saver Louise Nivison in Foster, Oregon who had been saving them for over 20 years.

SizeClear

Direct sow 1” deep in well prepared fertile soil from May through late June in rows that are 1’ apart. Thin seedlings to 6” spacing. Protect early sowings from frost, and for dry beans sow dry by early June. Requires trellising; try T-posts and bailing twine.

Seed Saving

Collect seed from pods that are fully dry. Shell by hand or by dancing. Winnow to clean if necessary. Test for dryness with a hammer – dry beans shatter. Once seeds are dry, keep them dry. Some cross-pollination may occur, but most beans self-pollinate

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  1. Bela

    Love Oregon Giants

    Bela

    Where did you grow this variety? Oregon

    My grandmother grew these in the 40s. We had been saving seed also for years but there were a few years where we lost them. Now we grow Cascade Giant which the Oregon Giant bean that was developed by Oregon state university to be stringless.

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