Pacific Northwest Grown,
Open Pollinated, and Organic Seed

Hot Pepper, Chilhuacle Negro (Organic)

(2 customer reviews)

$3.80$35.00

Capsicum annuum. Hot. 95 days.

When dried, this small to medium-sized, tapered bell shaped, dark chocolate brown pepper with leathery flesh is a key ingredient in the classic mole negro from Oaxaca, Mexico. When ripe, the flesh inside is deep purple. With very thin walls, they dry rather easily. Fruit are a bit hotter than cayennes and are especially good roasted over an open flame before making into salsa or mole, or as a piquant ingredient in stir-fry. We’re still working on selecting this gem for the Pacific Northwest, and hopefully it will continue to get earlier and more prolific each year.

Seed produced by Avoca in Corvallis, Oregon.

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  1. One person found this helpful
    Hungry Robin

    Hungry Robin

    I grew this pepper last year in Spokane, WA. My garden is zone 5 but depending on weather patterns I can get very early or late frost. This pepper was very productive, loading lots of peppers on 24″ tall plants. When picked the aroma was intoxicating.

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  2. Marietta Bonaventure

    best drying chili

    Marietta Bonaventure

    Where did you grow this variety? Oregon

    Ideal for drying and turning into chili sauce. Quickly dries down into a wrinkled black nubbin, but it packs a rich, spicy, chocolatey flavor.

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Sow indoors in flats with good potting soil as early as February, but no later than April. Keep warm and well-watered. Transplant seedlings into 4”pots when they have their first two true leaves. Transplant out into the garden after danger of frost has past, typically late May in western Oregon.

To save seed, wait until fruits are fully ripe. Remove seeds from fruit and dry on windowsill or with a fan. Isolate from other pepper varieties by at least 500 feet.