Adaptive Seeds

Featured Seed

Showing 1–32 of 403 results

  • Adaptive Lettuce Mix

    Adaptive Seeds Lettuce Mix (Organic)

    $3.80$12.80
    Lactuca sativa. 28 days baby.

    This lettuce mix contains many of our best lettuce varieties that are ideal for salad cutting, with a focus on varieties that we think are tasty and colorful. Mixing loose leaf, romaine, and oak leaf types means this mix can easily be used for cut-and-come-again salads. We recommend this mix for fall and spring sowings.


  • alexanders greens
    NEW!

    Alexanders (Organic)

    $3.50$6.50
    Smyrnium olusatrum. Perennial/Biennial.

    This ancient plant goes by many names and has a long history possibly going back to Alexander The Great. Large yellow-flowered umbel blooms are highly desirable to beneficial insects. Aromatic black seeds give Alexanders one of its synonyms – Black Lovage. Leaves are comparable to a mild-flavored parsley, and are tasty in salad or used as an herb. Short lived perennial or biennial that will self-sow and grow in sun or shade. Plants are not true perennials, they tend to die after flowering (which may take a few years). With its noninvasive habit, it is perfect for the low maintenance or semi-wild garden. Native to the Mediterranean, the Romans introduced it throughout Europe, where it can still be found growing wild near medieval monastery gardens. The Romans ate the leaves, stems, roots, and flower buds as vegetables. Seeds require a period of moist, cold conditions for germination. Sow in fall or early spring. Very winter hardy, plants sometimes go dormant in the summer. We thank Alan Kapuler of Peace Seeds for introducing this cool plant to the Oregon gardening scene. Aka, Alexander’s Greens, Alisanders, Black Lovage, Horse Parsley, Macedonian Parsley, and Maceron.


  • Amaranth, Miriah Leaf (Organic)

    Amaranth, Miriah Leaf (Organic)

    $3.00$12.00
    Amaranthus tricolor. Leaf/Greens. 25-50 days.

    A beautiful red-veined green leaf amaranth for salad and cooking. Leaf backs are all red, adding unique color to salad. A heat tolerant spinach substitute that is popular in Asia and Latin America. Also good cooked or pickled. A few years ago I tasted a kimchi made from amaranth leaf and it was very good! This type of amaranth is sometimes called Callaloo in the Caribbean where it is used to make a popular dish of the same name. We brought this variety back from the abyss in 2006 after it was lost commercially in 1999. Not a grain variety as it has black seeds.


  • Oeschberg Amaranth

    Amaranth, Oeschberg (Organic)

    $3.00$36.00
    Amaranthus cruentus. Flower. 70 days.

    Oeschberg is an amazing deep purple-red amaranth that is darker than Love Lies Bleeding, but with an upright growth habit. Seed heads are very highly branched and hold their color longer than other varieties, making it great for flower arrangements. Plants are a bit short for an upright amaranth at 4′ tall, which is great in the garden as they won’t shade out everything else. Leaves and seeds are edible. Leaves are good for a heat resistant salad green when young, red color develops early. May self-seed. Flowering amaranths can be succession-sown until the end of July for late- season flower production.


  • Amaranth, Sunset Goldilocks (Organic)

    Amaranth, Sunset Goldilocks (Organic)

    $3.00$60.00
    Amaranthus sp. Grain. 45 days leaf; 90 grain.

    Stocky plants grow 4-5′ tall for us, producing mostly light-gold heads packed with tiny blond seeds. Occasional bi- colored magenta plants are very beautiful and would be worth growing as an ornamental crop. Very early for a grain amaranth. Leaves can also be eaten raw when young or cooked like spinach when more mature. After plants are cut at the base for seed harvest, we have seen new leaves re-sprout, producing even more food! Overall a really great variety. We received it as a variable mix called Sunset Dwarf from Bountiful Gardens, grown at Golden Rule Garden. We re-selected heavily to eliminate any tall red plants and named it Goldilocks, since it has golden locks, and is not too tall and not too short. Enjoy!


  • Tuscan Arugula

    Arugula, Tuscan (Organic)

    $3.25$24.00
    Eruca sativa.

    Big thick leaves with excellent flavor and very cold hardy. For those who like their arugula to have a little kick, Tuscan has a spicier flavor than common varieties such as Astro. Some plants have strap-like leaves, others are lobed. Seed Ambassador Kayla Preece collected this variety from Agricultori Custodi, a seed preservation group in Tuscany, Italy.

    As required by the Oregon Department of Agriculture & the Washington Crucifer Quarantine, all Brassica family seed lots have been tested & found negative for blackleg (Phoma lingam) by an approved, certified lab.


  • California Giants Aster
    NEW!

    Aster, Giants of California (Organic)

    $3.50
    Callistephus chinensis. 90 days.

    Intense pom-poms of double, daisy-like flowers in bright and light pink, lavender, and white, providing a different palette than other flower mixes we offer. The color is so vivid on these it looks like someone turned the pastel saturation all the way up on grandma’s old TV. Flowers hold a long time both on and o the plant; long slender stems are good for cutting. Blooms to 4” across on plants that grow to 3′ tall. Annual.


  • Föckinghauser Barley

    Barley, Föckinghauser (Organic)

    $3.00
    Hordeum vulgare.

    A 2-row German hulled barley that can be used for malting or animal feed. This barley was picked out of a bag of Föckinghauser Oats that we collected in Germany. Andrew was excited for the barley’s sneaky way of contaminating the bag of oats because he wants to one day grow German malting barley for his own specialty malts for home brew. Malting and toasting small amounts of barley in the oven is an excellent addition to a home brew batch. It fills the house with a delicious aroma, and the rich freshness is imparted to the beer. Spring sow March through May.


  • Barley, Lawina Hulless (Organic)

    Barley, Lawina Hulless (Organic)

    $3.00$5.00
    Hordeum vulgare.

    This tasty hulless barley performed well for us from spring sowings. Short plants produce 2-rowed heads that thresh easily but don’t shatter. Hulless barley is a good bioregionally appropriate substitute for rice, as it produces well, is easy to process, and cooks up into a tasty, wholesome whole grain. Lawina was our golden barley variety of choice when we produced grain for market. We obtained this variety from the breeder, Karl-Josef Müller, on our first Seed Ambassadors trip to Germany.


  • Barley, Purple Hulless Improved

    Barley, Purple Hulless Improved

    $3.00$7.00
    Hordeum vulgare.

    Great in soups, whole grain salads, or try as an alternate in risotto. This variety is hulless, meaning that the hull falls off naturally during harvest ensuring the bran and germ remain. This results in whole grain edible barley. We recommend lightly toasting in a dry pan until barley begins to pop or smell like toast. Then cook like brown rice. The result is a fairly firm texture when cooked with a delightful rich nutty flavor. This variety is 6 row, and is less prone to lodging than Tibetan and other Purple Hulless barleys, which it may have been selected from. Best sown in spring.

    Seed produced by Lonesome Whistle Farm in Junction City, Oregon.


  • Basil, Italian Mountain Sweet (Organic)

    Basil, Italian Mountain Sweet (Organic)

    $3.50$20.00

    Ocimum basilicum.

    A strain of Italian sweet basil that is more cool weather resistant than other basil. From the mountains of Northern Italy via the seed company Seeds Trust, formally located in Montana. They report that it grows better than other basil in Montana & we find it to be a great producer outdoors in Oregon as well. The sweet rich flavor is similar to other Genovese types of basil & it is perfect for pesto & Caprese salad. Slow to bolt but not too slow to make seed. With its prolific flowers, that the bees go crazy for, the plants can be pulled to ripen seed after some of the seed capsules turn brown.


  • Thai Lemon Basil

    Basil, Thai Lemon (Organic)

    $3.50$20.00
    Ocimum citriodorum.

    This refreshing, citrus basil is a different species than its cousins Sweet Basil and Holy Basil, and is essential in certain South and Southeast Asian dishes. Thai Lemon Basil is also delicious with seafood, or as a more complex flavorful alternative to sweet basil in other dishes. It is best when added towards the end of cooking. Leaves are smaller and more pinnate, but otherwise it grows similarly to other basil types. We received our seed from villagers at Ban Noong Ta Klong in the Issan region of Thailand, while on a Seed Ambassadors Project trip in 2009. Aka, Hoary Basil, Hairy Basil, and Lemon Basil.


  • Chioggia Beet
    NEW!

    Beet, Chioggia (Organic)

    $3.80$12.80
    Beta vulgaris. Round Pink/White Rings. 65 days..

    In our days as market growers, Chioggia beets were by far our customers’ favorite, and we loved them too. Dark pink on the outside, the inside features concentric rings of pink and white. The candy cane like appearance is as pretty as it is fun. But Chioggia charms the palate, too – much sweeter than red beets, with less of the “earthy” flavor that turns some people o from this nutritious root vegetable. Winter Chioggia beets are just about as sweet as candy. Plus, they don’t bleed as much as red beets when cooked, although the striping does fade away. Very good simply roasted with a little olive oil and salt. Green leaves. Heirloom originally from Chioggia, Italy, that has been in the US since the 1860s. Seed produced by Alan Adesse in Junction City, Oregon.


  • Kamuolini 2 Beet

    Beet, Kamuolini 2

    $3.80$9.80
    Beta vulgaris. Round Red. 65 days.

    Vibrant color, beautiful round shape and classic sweet beet flavor make this variety our ideal beet. Vigorous leaf growth makes this beet two vegetables in one, easy to pull and perfect to tie in bunches. Leaf stems have an intriguing magenta-purple tint. In our trials against the overly common Red Ace F1 hybrid we found Kamuolini 2 to have better shape, flavor, yield, color, and taller tops. The Baltic region is a center of beet diversity and one of its centers of origin, so it makes good sense that we would find our ideal beet in Lithuania. Bred by and given to The Seed Ambassadors Project by Dr. Rasa Karkleliene, a vegetable seed breeder at the Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture. Seed produced by Abel Kloster and Tao Orion in Cottage Grove, Oregon.


  • Beet, Lutz Green Leaf

    Beet, Lutz Green Leaf

    $3.80$9.80
    Beta vulgaris. Round Red. 70-90 days.

    An old standby winter storage beet with deep-red roots and pale green leaves. The most common Lutz strain available now has red leaves and stems – we are offering the original green-stemmed variety whose leaves have much better flavor. The variety has suffered from lack of stewardship, but our friend Avram Drucker of Garlicana in southern Oregon has been working hard to change this, and we offer his strain which has been reselected for size and firmness. Avram says, “If I had to pick only one [beet] variety for homesteading, there’s just no question that this is it.” Lutz Green Leaf is claimed by most, to be “not a pretty beet,” but we disagree, finding it to be quite pretty and amazingly sweet as well. Light green leaves are especially tasty for beet greens, and are good when young in salads or cooked up like chard when more mature. Word is roots stay tender even when very large (up to 12 lbs!) – I can’t imagine any beet being pretty at that size. Lutz Green Leaf has won us over. Seed produced by Garlicana in Douglas County, Oregon.


  • Beet, Shiraz

    Beet, Shiraz (Organic)

    $3.80$35.00
    Beta vulgaris. Round Red. 60 days.

    Round red roots with red leaf stems and green leaves. Vigorous and uniform with smooth skin and tall tops, Shiraz is a good choice for market growers and home gardeners alike. Not quite as sweet as Lutz Green Leaf, but still quite tasty. Young leaves make a great addition to salad mix. Bred through a farmer and breeder collaboration with the Organic Seed Alliance, it was selected in organic growing conditions primarily for resistance to rhizoctonia dry rot (the most common cause of Ugly Beet Syndrome). For the full story check out: seedrevolutionnow.blogspot.com Seed produced by Deep Harvest Farm on Whidbey Island, Washington.


  • Blanket Flower
    Out of Stock

    Blanket Flower (Organic)

    $3.25
    Gaillardia arisata. Perennial to zone 3.

    Blanket Flower produces beautiful, cheery daisy-like flowers on long sturdy stems are a great, long-lasting cut flower that bloom over a long season. Flowers are red-orange in the center, petals have yellow tips. After each blossom is done flowering the seedheads make beautiful little balls that look like balloons and also look nice in arrangements. Blanket Flower is a great low-maintenance addition to any perennial flower garden. It is deer resistant, drought tolerant, and prefers full sun. Plants will grow 1-2′ wide and up to 3′ tall.


  • Broccoli, Nutribud

    Broccoli, Nutribud

    $3.50$9.50
    Brassica oleracea. 55-70 days.

    A great open pollinated broccoli bred in Oregon by plant breeder Dr. Alan Kapuler of Peace Seeds. This is the broccoli to grow for flavor. The sweetest, richest and possibly the most nutritious broccoli for spring and fall. We had a group of middle school kids eating this broccoli raw out of the garden! Deep-green florets, central head and prolific side shoots make this an excellent variety for the home gardener. Tested high in free glutamine, which is a building block of protein, a powerful energy source for the brain, and an important healing nutrient for the body. Not the largest heads and it doesn’t like hot weather.

    Seed produced by Turnip the Beet Farm in Lorane, Oregon.

    As required by the Oregon Department of Agriculture & the Washington Crucifer Quarantine, all Brassica family seed lots have been tested & found negative for blackleg (Phoma lingam) by an approved, certified lab.


  • Broccoli, Umpqua

    Broccoli, Umpqua (Organic)

    $3.50$18.00
    Brassica oleracea. 50-70 days.

    Excellent blue-green color. 6-8” heads, good side shoot production. Early to size up from spring planting yet resists premature bolting. Beautiful and stress tolerant, especially for an OP. This spring and fall broccoli was bred by Tim Peters of Peters Seed and Research. Seed produced by Uprising Organics in Acme, Washington.

    As required by the Oregon Department of Agriculture & the Washington Crucifer Quarantine, all Brassica family seed lots have been tested & found negative for blackleg (Phoma lingam) by an approved, certified lab.


  • Darkmar Brussels Sprouts
    NEW!

    Brussels Sprouts, Darkmar 21 (Organic)

    $3.50$12.50
    Brassica oleracea. Green. 180-260 days.

    One of the most reliable, easy-to-grow open pollinated Brussels sprout varieties out there. Firm, sweet, dark green sprouts form on plants that grow to 3 1⁄2 ft. We trialed every open pollinated Brussels sprout we could find; Darkmar 21 was the obvious choice for mid-season because of its consistent large sprout production and vigor in the field. A classic Brussels sprout variety that is popular in the UK but not widely available in the US. Sow in April or May for sprouts in November through February. For optimal sprout production, pinch the growth tip off in late August. Originally selected in Bedfordshire, England. Aka, Bedford Darkmar 21.

    As required by the Oregon Department of Agriculture & the Washington Crucifer Quarantine, all Brassica family seed lots have been tested & found negative for blackleg (Phoma lingam) by an approved, certified lab.


  • Early Half Tall Brussels Sprouts
    NEW!

    Brussels Sprouts, Early Half Tall (Organic)

    $3.50$7.00
    Brassica oleracea. Green. 100-200 days.

    Forgot to sow your Brussels sprouts in spring? All is not lost! With Early Half Tall, you can sow in June and still get a crop of sprouts by autumn. For a good early rotation of this winter garden delight, sow in March or April – sprouts are harvestable as early as August. Nice, dense sprout formation on dwarf plants that grow to 2 1⁄2 ft. Lower stature helps keep plants upright in windy conditions or in waterlogged soil. Early Half Tall is one of the few open pollinated varieties that has been well maintained since the introduction of hybrids.

    As required by the Oregon Department of Agriculture & the Washington Crucifer Quarantine, all Brassica family seed lots have been tested & found negative for blackleg (Phoma lingam) by an approved, certified lab.


  • Red Bull Brussels Sprouts

    Brussels Sprouts, Red Bull (Organic)

    $3.50$60.00
    Brassica oleracea. 210-260 days.

    Vigorous 3’ plants form 1-2” sprouts in fall and winter when transplanted into the field May to early June. Sweet, nutty flavor especially after frost when the plants turn a deeper red. Sprouts stay red when cooked. In our opinion, one of the few good open pollinated red Brussels sprouts. Very hardy and far superior to Rubine, though there is some variability in plant color, sprout size and formation. Late to mature. When planted in May sprouts are ready for harvest December – February. Originally sourced from Tozer’s seed company in England, we thank Jeff and Carri at Pitchfork & Crow for their continued stewardship of this variety. Seed produced by Pitchfork & Crow in Lebanon, Oregon.

    As required by the Oregon Department of Agriculture & the Washington Crucifer Quarantine, all Brassica family seed lots have been tested & found negative for blackleg (Phoma lingam) by an approved, certified lab.


  • Burdock, Okinawa Long

    Burdock, Okinawa Long (Organic)

    $3.50$25.00

    Arctium lappa.

    A variety originating in Okinawa, an island of southern Japan. The people of Okinawa are known for their long lives & health, which burdock may play a part. Often cooked in soups or pickled, it is known for its healing properties & high vitamin content. Beautiful flowers. The burdock root’s ability to penetrate heavy clay subsoil can help improve drainage, but be careful – once burdock is in your garden it is difficult to get it all out. Given to The Seed Ambassadors Project in 2006 by the proprietors of Urtegartneriet, a small Danish biodynamic seed company.


  • Beers Bean

    Bush Dry Bean, Beers (Organic)

    $3.50$7.50
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Yellow/Tan. 90 days.

    Who would have thought that there was an Oregon Coast heirloom dry bean! We thought it must be good because growing dry beans on the Oregon coast is not easy. Given to us at a seed swap by a woman who had been growing it for many years near Lincoln City. Not named for the Beers Family folk band of the 1960s, and not because it makes you thirsty, but for Charles and Priscilla Beers who brought the bean from Nebraska to the Oregon Coast in 1895. Though a pairing with the beverage of the same name would probably work out just fine. Beans are a dark tan/yellow color, similar to Arikara, but plants are more productive and a little later to mature – 100 days on the coast, 90 days inland. A multipurpose bean that is good in any bean recipe.


  • Borlotti Valdarno

    Bush Dry Bean, Borlotto del Valdarno (Organic)

    $3.50$60.00
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Tan Speckled. 90 days.

    Beautiful, classic borlotto bean with an elongated shape. Tan with maroon speckles and stripes. It has a delicious delicate flavor perfectly suited to pasta e fagioli, one of those dishes that everybody seems to cook in Italy. This is one of the most productive beans in our trials to date, alongside Brighstone. Seed Ambassador Kayla Preece collected this for us in 2006 from Agricultori Custodi, a seed preservation group in Tuscany, Italy, and we have been growing it for market ever since.


  • brighstone bush dry bean

    Bush Dry Bean, Brighstone (Organic)

    $3.50$60.00
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Tan speckled. 90 days.

    Wonderful early, very high yielding dry bean. Pods and seeds mottled with dark purple. Excellent tasting as a dry bean, somewhere between a kidney and pinto in flavor. Used in England as a snap bean, but we find it to be only of fair snap bean quality unless very young. Heirloom variety said to be from an 1800s shipwreck on the Isle of Wight in the United Kingdom. Brought back from the brink by Seed Guardian Fred Arnold with the Heritage Seed Library, England. We sourced it during our Seed Ambassadors trip in 2006.


  • Bush Dry Bean, Early Warwick (Organic)

    Bush Dry Bean, Early Warwick (Organic)

    $3.50$60.00
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Red Speckled. 85 days.

    Cool weather tolerant, small bushes loaded with pods. Stocky bushes yield heavy with small round, dark-red mottled beans. Early enough to mature in England, where it is from. Also very reliable here in Oregon. It is usually the first dry bean we bring to market in the fall, a week or two before most of the others. Currently our favorite bean for chili and great for most bean dishes. Traditionally grown before 1890 in Warwick, England. Preserved by the Heritage Seed Library, England.


  • Bush Dry Bean, Kenearly Yellow Eye

    Bush Dry Bean, Kenearly Yellow Eye (Organic)

    $3.50$60.00
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Tan Speckled. 90 days.

    A favorite throughout the Northeast for baked beans and hearty winter soups. Used in the South as a tastier black-eyed pea. We frequently substitute Kenearly Yellow Eye for cannellini beans in our favorite recipe – kale and cannellinis. Beans hold their shape when cooked, or can be blended down into a rich and creamy base that is a good dairy-free alternative to heavy cream for use in sauces, soups, and casseroles. Originally developed in Kentville, Nova Scotia for an early and uniform harvest. Plants are tall and upright and hold their pods o the ground, which is great for hand-harvest and for mechanical harvest.


  • Nez Perce Dry Bean
    NEW!

    Bush Dry Bean, Nez Perce (Organic)

    $3.50$7.50
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Yellow Brown. 80 days.

    A light golden-brown, small dry bean rivaling other beans for early maturity. With its mild and creamy flavor, Nez Perce is a good all-purpose bean, and especially delightful when cooked as refried beans. Similar to Indian Woman Yellow, but smaller and with a lighter colored seed coat.Very reliable and easy to grow in cool summer or short season areas. Short bushy plants show indeterminate growth but are easily harvested once most of the pods have dried down. As the name suggests, it is believed to originate with the Nez Perce tribe in Eastern Oregon and Idaho, however the bean’s history with the tribe is uncertain. Other similar bean varieties were grown by tribes further east and the seed may have been brought by settlers to the area. Grown in northern Idaho in the 1930s by Henry Marcus Purnell and maintained for decades in Idaho by the Denny Family. Our strain of Nez Perce comes to us from seed savers Aline Crehore and Steve Trimmell, who run a small seed company here in Western Oregon called Green Journey Seed.


  • Oland swedish brown

    Bush Dry Bean, Öland Swedish Brown (Organic)

    $3.50$60.00
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Brown. 90 days.

    Small, round brown bean with a mellow flavor. Traditionally used in Swedish sweet and sour bean stew (made with molasses and vinegar), though we prefer it in Boston baked beans. Brown beans have been a staple in Sweden for hundreds of years. Though they were once grown in several areas of the country, Öland, an island off the south-east coast, is now the only place where they are still grown. Featured in the Slow Food Ark of Taste, we found it in 2010 when we attended Terra Madre in Turin, Italy. For recipes and a complete history, check out this PDF: baljvaxtakademin.se/home/baljvaxter/ The_swedish_brown_bean.pdf


  • Bush Dry Bean, Rosso di Lucca

    Bush Dry Bean, Rosso di Lucca (Organic)

    5 out of 5
    $3.50$60.00
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Rosy Speckled. 90 days.

    Very productive and early bean. Beautiful rosy red, oblong beans with dark stripes and speckles. Said by growers in Italy to have a rich delicious flavor, pairing well with other strong flavors such as garlic, sage and rich fruity olive oil. We agree and love to use it as a replacement for kidney beans. Seed Ambassador Kayla Preece collected this variety for us in 2006 from Agricultori Custodi, a seed preservation group in Tuscany, Italy.


  • titus cannellini bean

    Bush Dry Bean, Titus Cannellini (Organic)

    $3.50$60.00
    Phaseolus vulgaris. White. 95 days.

    Customers at market frequently asked us for cannellini beans and we know why: the pure white beans are delicious and creamy, yet hold their texture well when cooked. They pair amazingly well with our totem vegetable, kale, and shine in minestrone, Sarah’s favorite soup. We had tried growing a few varieties but had always found them too late maturing for our needs. Enter Tom Titus, biologist, friend of The Seed Ambassadors Project, seed saver, and author of Blackberries in July. Tom brought seeds from the cannellini bean his mother had been growing for 30 years in our area to a seed swap we attended, and after growing them out we realized this was what we had been waiting for. One of the best things about this bean is that it doesn’t shatter during harvest. Many heritage bean varieties drop beans on the ground before all the pods ripen, but the Titus Cannellini beans stay in the pod until harvest, perhaps making them the best variety we offer for market growers.