Adaptive Seeds

Bush Snap

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  • Bush Snap Bean, Alice Sunshine (Organic)

    Bush Snap Bean, Alice Sunshine (Organic)

    $3.80$10.80
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Green Pods. 55 days.

    Excellent green bean flavor with a rich sweetness and nice crunch. A good multi-purpose variety for both snap and dry bean production. Good yields of 6” at green pods that when mature contain beautiful light yellow beans with brown splotches that are also a tasty dry bean. Plants have upright growth habit which make for easy picking and fewer losses from slugs and mold. Bred by the late Robert Lobitz of Paynesville, Minnesota.


  • Bush Snap Bean, Buerre de Rocquencourt (Organic)

    Bush Snap Bean, Beurre de Rocquencourt (Organic)

    $3.80$62.00
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Yellow Pods. 50 days.

    This delicate yellow wax bean was the first to mature for us in 2014. Delicious buttery flavor, uniform size and shape for easy processing, and high yields make this a standout bush wax variety. Yellow pods can be picked when small as fillet beans for an extra tender texture. Plants grow well in cold and wet growing conditions in the beginning of the season, so they are well adapted to northern climates. According to Mother Earth News, “The variety takes its name from Rocquencourt, a town near Versailles. In the 19th and early 20th centuries Rocquencourt was famous for its fine vegetables, so the name carried the connotation of high quality. The bean evolved locally through selection and became fully recognized as a commercial variety in the 1930s.” Thanks for the intel Mother Earth News!


  • Bush Snap Bean, Cupidon (Organic)

    Bush Snap Bean, Cupidon (Organic)

    $3.80$10.80
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Green Pods. 55 days.

    As vegetable growers we used to be less than excited about filet beans until we found Cupidon. Not only is it the best filet bean we have found, but it is one of the best beans period. Delicious aromatic sweet flavor. High yielding, light green, stringless, long, slender, French filet type pods. Plants can get two feet tall if irrigated and fertilized, while yielding lots of pods over a long season. Our favorite trait of Cupidon is that the pods are tasty even when they are very large. A good variety for market growers and gardeners, because the fruit are held high on the plant for easy harvest. Resistant to Common Bean Mosaic Virus 1. We received our original seed from the wonderful folks at Real Seeds in Wales.


  • Bush Snap Bean, Hildora (Organic)

    Bush Snap Bean, Hildora (Organic)

    $3.80$10.80
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Yellow Pods. 60 days.

    Another one of those tasty wax beans that just seem to thrive in our climate. A deep yellow productive wax bean bred in Germany by the seed company Hild. Great for fresh market producers and gardeners alike. The medium-long pods are sweet and crunchy with mid-to-early maturity for a bush bean. High resistance to bean common mosaic virus. Our original seed came from a 2006 seed swap in England.


  • Bush Snap Bean, Labrador (Organic)

    Bush Snap Bean, Labrador (Organic)

    $3.80$10.80
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Green Pods. 58 days.

    Dark green, round, stringless snap bean on upright dwarf plants. Uniform 51⁄2” beans are good for processing. With a longer than average shelf life, this variety is a great choice for market growers. Long continual harvest window for a bush type. Bred by Asgrow in 1984, this high quality commercial snap bean has been nearly dropped from the seed trade. The PVP expired in 2004 and it’s now in the public domain. Resistant to anthracnose and bean common mosaic virus. Given to us during our 2006 Seed Ambassadors trip by Christina Henatsch, a seed grower and breeder for Bingenheimer, a German biodynamic seed company.


  • Bush Snap Bean, Marona (Organic)

    Bush Snap Bean, Marona (Organic)

    $3.80$14.80
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Green Pods. 60 days.

    A reliable green early maturing snap bean with long round pods. Early high yields that hold up well once picked. Very tasty tender beans are great for direct market sales. Good for summer and autumn rotations and produces well in dry conditions. Marona has everything you need to be a go-to market farm production variety, also perfect for gardeners who want buckets of beans. Resistant to bean common mosaic virus. We found this variety in Germany at Bingenheimer Saatgut, a biodynamic seed company.


  • Bean Marvel of Piedmont

    Bush Snap Bean, Marvel of Piedmont (Organic)

    $3.80$10.80
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Speckled Pods. 55 days.

    Marvel of Piedmont is a richly flavored, bush Romano type bean. Flat pale yellow pods are streaked with purple which fades with cooking. Tasty and productive, resembles Dragon Tongue beans but with lighter colored pods that are slightly less speckled. Italian bean hailing from the Piedmont region, where the city of Turin is located and is also the site of the famed Slow Food Terra Madre gatherings. Every other year thousands of food crazed farmers and eaters converge there for quite an international party. In 2010 we were fortunate to participate in the event as delegates. It was amazing to see such a celebration of food so concentrated at one time and in one place.


  • Bush Snap Bean, Pisarecka Zlutoluske (Organic)

    Bush Snap Bean, Pisarecka Zlutoluske (Organic)

    $3.80$62.00
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Yellow Pods. 50 days.

    Heirloom wax bean with delicious, round, yellow pods on sturdy plants. Beans can be picked small or large, as the wonderful flavor and nice yellow color develop when the pods are young. Super productive, early maturing, and cold tolerant variety that is perfect for the Pacific Northwest. Originating in Hungary and came our way via Seed Dreams in Port Townsend, Washington.


  • Robert's Royalty Beans

    Bush Snap Bean, Robert’s Royalty (Organic)

    $3.80$62.00
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Purple Pods. 55 days.

    Another masterpiece bred by Robert Lobitz! Produces beautiful medium-dark purple pods with great bean flavor. Similar to the variety Royal Burgundy with slightly shorter pods on more prolific and compact plants. Like Royal Burgundy, Robert’s Royalty is early maturing and cool weather tolerant, germinating better in cold soil than most other beans. If you want to try some other great beans bred by Robert Lobitz try Alice Sunshine.


  • Bush Snap Bean, Saxa (Organic)

    Bush Snap Bean, Saxa (Organic)

    $3.80$10.80
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Green Pods. 55 days.

    Early maturing, strong bushes yield heavy with 4-5″ green beans. A popular old variety in Germany and the Netherlands. Very tolerant of poor weather and growing conditions. Excellent rich flavor that is missing in many modern varieties. Best picked when pods are young. We obtained this variety from the biodynamic seed company Bingenhiemer Saatgut when visiting Germany in 2007.


  • Bush Snap Bean, Wachs Beste von Allen

    Bush Snap Bean, Wachs Beste von Allen (Organic)

    $3.80$14.80
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Yellow Pods. 60 days.

    Productive German yellow wax bean. 5 1⁄2” long yellow pods. Like most wax beans, this variety also has a mild delicious flavor with an excellent tenderness. White seeds have a small black shield figure, similar to a soldier bean. Formerly a popular commercial variety in Europe that was dropped from the European Union Common Catalog in 2000. Hopefully as the EU seed laws change to support biodiversity, this variety will once again become available to farmers and gardeners there. Some sources say it was released in 1942 in Europe while others say it is an old time American bean with the name, “Best of All.”


  • Wade Bush Snap Bean

    Bush Snap Bean, Wade (Organic)

    $3.80$62.00
    Phaseolus vulgaris. Green Pods. 60 days.

    A classic dark green, bush snap bean with smooth round 6-7” long pods. With its high yields and dependability we recommend this bean as a market farm production variety. Excellent when eaten fresh, frozen, or canned. The pods hold well once picked so they make it to market in good condition. A near predecessor of Provider, with which it shares many positive traits such as good cold soil emergence and cool weather tolerance. Developed in 1952 by Dr. B. L. Wade of the USDA Southeastern Vegetable Breeding Laboratory in Charleston, South Carolina. It was noted for being more prolific than Tendergreen, one of the first widely planted stringless beans, which it was bred to surpass. Resistant to bean common mosaic virus and was an All-American Selections winner in 1952. Long unavailable commercially in the US. We found this variety at Bingenheimer Saatgut in Germany.