Adaptive Seeds

Fava Beans

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  • Fava Bean, Aprovecho Select (Organic)
    Out of Stock

    Fava Bean, Aprovecho Select (Organic)

    5 out of 5
    $3.80
    Vicia faba.

    The legendary fava! The biggest fava bean seed we have ever seen and the taste is delicious. The giant plants yield heavily with pods containing four big green seeds each. The young leaves and shoots also make a delicious salad green. Nearly lost forever, or at least from commerce, this fava bean is one of the best and it was difficult tracking it down. We searched for years and found only two people that had any seed left. These last two sources were our friends Taylor Zeigler of Eugene, Oregon and Heike-Marie Eubanks of Myrtle Point, Oregon, two paragons of the Oregon seed saving scene. Selected for hardiness and flavor by Ianto Evans at Aprovecho Research Center in Cottage Grove, Oregon. Both Ianto and Aprovecho are pillars of the permaculture and appropriate technology movement. It is a delight to have this fava bean in our catalog.


  • Fava Bean, Ianto's Return (Organic)

    Fava Bean, Ianto’s Return (Organic)

    $3.80
    Vicia faba.

    Mostly large seeds of many colors ranging from tan, yellow, purple, lavender-tan to almost black. High culinary value and adaptive resilience—hangs tough in our winters when most fava varieties wither in the cold. Big plants with many tillers. Young leaves and shoots also make a tasty salad green. Strongly selected for over-wintering by Nick Routledge and Adaptive Seeds in the Willamette Valley since 2007. Interbreeding population of many strains from Ianto Evans’ original fava diversity. Seed produced by Taproot Growers in Springfield, Oregon.


  • fava sweet lorane

    Fava Bean, Sweet Lorane

    $3.80$30.00
    Vicia faba.

    Small seeded favas are usually relegated to cover crop status, but Sweet Lorane was selected to have good, sweet flavor, so it’s an excellent choice for a dual-purpose crop to feed both the soil and the gardener. The flavor is excellent and is especially delicious in fava hummus. Usually sown in autumn for cover cropping and for higher yields, favas may also be spring sown. Extremely winter hardy – we have seen this variety muster through winter temps of 0 ̊F with only a few inches of snow for protection. When grown as a dry bean, Sweet Lorane is less prone to splitting during harvest than the larger seeded types. Bred by Steve Solomon in the 1980s and re-selected more recently by Alan Adesse right here in the Willamette Valley of Oregon. Seed produced by Lonesome Whistle Farm in Junction City, Oregon.