Runner Bean, British Pop (Organic)

Phaseolus coccineus. Mix. 70-90 days.

A genetically diverse population of edible-pod type runner beans from the British Isles. We have loved growing runner beans from across the pond for some time now and with so many good ones in our trials, we decided to let the best coalesce into one big British Pop mix. Our favorites in this crossed-up mix are Tenderstar, Prizewinner, White Emergo, and Polestar. We have selected for vigor, yield, long pods, and a diversity of seed coat color – a rainbow of lavender pastels, black, white, tan, and speckles that are hard to describe. While the long and tender green pods are the main crop for this variety, the fresh shelled and dry beans themselves are also delicious. Since they are more tolerant of cooler weather conditions than common beans, they may grow back as a “perennial vegetable” if the ground doesn’t freeze too deeply in winter.

1 oz ≈ 20 seeds
$3.90

In stock

4 oz
$7.80

Out of stock

Geographical Origin

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Direct sow 1” deep after danger of frost but before the end of June. Plant at 4” in-row spacing with 18” between rows. Requires something tall to climb. Well-suited for bean teepees made from bamboo poles. Prefers cooler temps and consistent moisture Collect seeds from beans that are fully dry (also good as a fresh shelling bean or green snap beans). Shell by hand or by dancing on the dry pods, winnow or screen to clean. Test for dryness with a hammer – dry beans shatter, moist beans squish.

Seed Saving

Runner Beans are cross-pollinating. Isolate from other varieties of the same species by 1/4 mile.

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4.25 out of 5 stars

5 reviews

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What others are saying

  1. Question

    Menlo Gardener

    Which of the four varieties included in this mix produces those beautiful purple dry beans? Thanks!

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    • Andrew Still

      Shop Manager Andrew Still

      The lavender purple color probably came originally from Prizewinner. However the mix is freely cross-pollinating so the purple color may contain the genes from may parents.

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  2. Mike

    I love these beans

    Mike (verified owner)

    Where did you grow this variety? Oregon

    These are the most striking beans I’ve grown. Beautiful scarlet blossoms, huge long pods and the most vibrant dried beans. Good eating and high yields too. These are a keeper for sure.

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  3. alyssa

    Beautiful plant and bean. Did not like eating pod.

    alyssa

    Where did you grow this variety? Washington

    What grew was not what we expected. The bean plants are gorgeous. The pods are very big and long. However they did not taste good. Basically zero flavor and kinda like eating something hairy. The beans taken out of the pods aren’t as gorgeous as what we put in the ground, but we will see how they taste cooked.

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  4. Beverly Logas Koopman

    High quality, Bean ID help?

    Beverly Logas Koopman (verified owner)

    Where did you grow this variety? Midwestern US

    The mix makes it inexpensive to try several different varieties of a bean we’re not familiar with, which is awesome.

    The mix names four cultivars but gives no clues about which is which. Reading, it’s recommended that only one cultivar be grown within 1/4 mile of other runner beans to avoid cross pollination. That means growing one set per year to figure out which we prefer.

    For lots of reasons, it would be extremely helpful to have a labeled photo or description that helps identify which bean is which cultivar. So far I’ve figured out that White Emergo is white, and Prizewinner is the lightest mottled bean. Can’t confirm the pure black one as Polestar, but that’s what I’m guessing.

    I’ll check back hoping for help with this.

    I ordered a number of other seeds and am impressed with the company’s ethos and seed quality. Germination is strong in everything started so far.

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    • One person found this helpful

      Andrew Still

      Hi Beverly, The Runner Bean population has been freely and intentionally cross-pollinating for many seasons and it is now difficult to say what bean is what. The colors you mention were associated with some of the varieties listed at some point, but now they are all crossed genetically and impossible to trace back. I hope this helps and sorry for not being more clear before. Thanks for the helpful review!

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  5. Christina Wenger

    Productive, tasty, reliably perennial in SF

    Christina Wenger (verified owner)

    Where did you grow this variety? California

    This is an incredibly productive genetic mix of runner beans, with long, tasty, sweet pods. The beans are delicious barely blanched and used in salads, or blistered in a wok with chile and soy. The vines are vigorous, pretty pest resistant, attract the hummingbirds, and in our climate, come back each year (five years now). For a temperate food forest or permaculture garden, these are an absolute win.

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