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Pacific Northwest Grown,
Open Pollinated, and Organic Seed

Green Onions, White Spear (Organic)

Allium fistulosum. Green Onion / Scallion. 60 days.

Andrew’s favorite green onion! Dependably produces beautiful bunches of green onions. Upright growth with no flopping, vigorous and easy to clean. So perfect that you don’t even need to cut the tops off. Bright green leaves and white bottoms are tall yet stocky. We have been selecting this variety for overwintering with much success. White Spear will go perennial and slowly self propagate in our Pacific Northwest climate, as long as you don’t eat them all.

1/2 g packet ≈ 100 seeds
$3.90

In stock

2 g packet ≈ 400 seeds
$6.90

In stock

1/4 oz
$14.00

In stock

1 oz
$28.00

In stock

1/4 lb
$60.00

In stock

Geographical Origin

Sow indoors in flats with good potting soil February through July. Transplant into the garden in April to August, when plants are at least the size of a No. 2 pencil lead. Space clumps of plants 6” in rows that are 12′ apart. Green onions benefit from frequent watering and shallow cultivation. Harvest when they are the size you want to eat.

Seed Saving

To save seed, replant at least 20 onions (to avoid inbreeding) in the second spring. Large, beautiful globe shaped flowers attract pollinators. Cut whole seed heads when they open and show the black seeds. Thresh gently and winnow to remove debris and hollow seeds.  Isolate from other Alliums of the same species by at least ½ mile.

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5 out of 5 stars

1 review

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What others are saying

  1. Callan

    Vigerous and longlasting

    Callan (verified owner)

    Where did you grow this variety? Mountain West US

    2018 was my first attempt at growing onions in my large, 55 day growing season garden. I was successful with these so launched a 3 x 4 bed of them in 2019. I started them indoors and after transplant they took off. We ate tender new ones early and throughout the season and by late summer they were fat (but not floppy) and I pulled them and dried a gallon of tops and a gallon of bottoms (they dry at different speeds). We have enjoyed them all winter and I can hardly wait to start my 2020 ones. I could NEVER have anticipated they would do so well. Garden stars for long days, cool nights.

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